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Peruvian Restaurants in Los Angeles – California

Peruvian Restaurants - Beverly Hills, California


1. Picca


West Los Angeles
9575 W Pico Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone number(310) 277-0133


2. Con Sabor A Perú

Mid-City
5163 Venice Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90019
Phone number(323) 936-4444


3. The Happy Inka
West Los Angeles
Los Angeles, CA 90067
Phone number(310) 874-4409


4. Pacha

Hollywood
Los Angeles, CA 90046
Phone number(424) 224-9231

Peruvian Restaurants - Burbank, Los Angeles, California

1. Lau’s Peruvian Food

Burbank
2315 Victory Blvd
Burbank, CA 91506
Phone number(818) 848-1192

2. Mamita Peruvian Restaurant

Glendale
714 S Brand Blvd
Glendale, CA 91204
Phone number(818) 243-5121

3. Natalie Peruvian Seafood Restaurant

Hollywood
5759 Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028
Phone number(323) 463-8340

4. Lola’s Peruvian Restaurant

Glendale
230 N Brand Blvd
Glendale, CA 91203
Phone number(818) 956-5888

5. Con Sazón

6514 San Fernando Rd
Glendale, CA 91201
Phone number(818) 500-8713

6. Las Quenas

North Hollywood
12708 Sherman Way
North Hollywood, CA 91605
Phone number(818) 764-3962

7. El Hatuchay

North Hollywood
12853 Sherman Way
San Fernando Valley, CA 91605
Phone number(818) 982-9811

8. Pacha

Hollywood
Los Angeles, CA 90046
Phone number(424) 224-9231

Peruvian Restaurants - Culver City, Los Angeles, California

1. Paiche


13488 Maxella Ave
Marina Del Rey, CA 90292
Phone number(310) 893-6100

2. Qusqo Bistro and Gallery


West Los Angeles
11633 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90025
Phone number(310) 312-3800

Peruvian Resturants - Downtown, Los Angeles, California

1. Picante Latin Fusion Restaurant

Downtown
324 E Olympic
Los Angeles, CA 90015
Phone number(213) 765-0201

2. Mo-Chica

Downtown
514 W 7th St
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Phone number(213) 622-3744

3. Test Kitchen 2012

2121 E 7th Pl
Los Angeles, CA 90021
Phone number(310) 277-0133

4. Intiraymi Restaurant Peruvian Food

Chinatown
633 N Spring St
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Phone number(213) 617-0573

Peruvian Resturants - Encino, Los Angeles, California


1. Listo el Pollo


Reseda
6800 Reseda Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 91335
Phone number(818) 705-3000

2. Lima Peruvian Cuisine & Lounge

Tarzana
19540 Ventura Blvd
Tarzana, CA 91356
Phone number(818) 758-3902

Peruvian Resturant - Glendale, Los Angeles, California

1. Mamita Peruvian Restaurant

Glendale
714 S Brand Blvd
Glendale, CA 91204
Phone number(818) 243-5121

2. Lola’s Peruvian Restaurant

Glendale
230 N Brand Blvd
Glendale, CA 91203
Phone number(818) 956-5888

3. Los Balcones Del Perú

Hollywood
1360 Vine St
Hollywood, CA 90028
Phone number(323) 871-9600

4. Natalie Peruvian Seafood Restaurant

Hollywood
5759 Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028
Phone number(323) 463-8340

5. Choza Mama

Pasadena
96 E Colorado Blvd
Pasadena, CA 91105
Phone number(626) 432-4692

6. Don Felix Restaurant

4435 Fountain Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90029
Phone number(323) 669-7575

7. Con Sazón

6514 San Fernando Rd
Glendale, CA 91201
Phone number(818) 500-8713

8. Lau’s Peruvian Food

Burbank
2315 Victory Blvd
Burbank, CA 91506
Phone number(818) 848-1192

Peruvian Restaurants - Hollywood, Los Angeles, California

1. Los Balcones Del PerúHollywood
1360 Vine St
Hollywood, CA 90028
Phone number(323) 871-96002. Natalie Peruvian Seafood Restaurant

Hollywood
5759 Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028
Phone number(323) 463-8340

3. Mario’s Peruvian & Seafood

Mid Wilshire
5786 Melrose Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90038
Phone number(323) 466-4181

4. Picca

West Los Angeles
9575 W Pico Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone number(310) 277-0133

5. Mamita Peruvian Restaurant

Glendale
714 S Brand Blvd
Glendale, CA 91204
Phone number(818) 243-5121

6. Picante Latin Fusion Restaurant

Downtown
324 E Olympic
Los Angeles, CA 90015
Phone number(213) 765-0201

7. Mo-Chica

Downtown
514 W 7th St
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Phone number(213) 622-3744

8. Lola’s Peruvian Restaurant

Glendale
230 N Brand Blvd
Glendale, CA 91203
Phone number(818) 956-5888

9. Con Sabor A Perú

Mid-City
5163 Venice Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90019
Phone number(323) 936-4444

10. Don Felix Restaurant

4435 Fountain Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90029
Phone number(323) 669-7575

Peruvian Resturants - North Hollywood, Los Angeles, California

1. Las Quenas

North Hollywood
12708 Sherman Way
North Hollywood, CA 91605
Phone number(818) 764-3962

2. El Hatuchay

North Hollywood
12853 Sherman Way
San Fernando Valley, CA 91605
Phone number(818) 982-9811

3. Takatis Peruvian Chicken Pollo a la Brasa

Van Nuys
6470 Van Nuys Blvd
Van Nuys, CA 91401
Phone number(818) 781-8122


4. Puro Sabor

Van Nuys
6366 Van Nuys Blvd
Van Nuys, CA 91497
Phone number(818) 908-0818

5. Con Sazón

6514 San Fernando Rd
Glendale, CA 91201
Phone number(818) 500-8713

6. Lau’s Peruvian Food

Burbank
2315 Victory Blvd
Burbank, CA 91506
Phone number(818) 848-1192

7. Super Pollo

Van Nuys
14519 Sherman Way
Van Nuys, CA 91405
Phone number(818) 785-6991

8. Nazca Peruvian Restaurants

24 reviews
Peruvian
Van Nuys
14357 Victory Blvd
Van Nuys, CA 91401
Phone number(818) 782-6808

9. Machu-Picchu Peruvian Restaurant

Van Nuys
6465 Van Nuys Blvd
Van Nuys, CA 91401
Phone number(818) 997-3394

10. Pacha


Hollywood
Los Angeles, CA 90046
Phone number(424) 224-9231

Peruvian Restaurants - Pasadena, Los Angeles, California

1. Choza Mama

Pasadena
96 E Colorado Blvd
Pasadena, CA 91105
Phone number(626) 432-4692

Peruvian Restaurant - Redondo Beach, Los Angeles, California

1. El Pollo Inka

Torrance
23705 Hawthorne Blvd
Torrance, CA 90505
Phone number(310) 373-0062

2. El Rocoto

1356 W Artesia Blvd
Gardena, CA 90248
Phone number(310) 768-8768

3. Inka Wasi

40 Peninsula Ctr
Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274
Phone number(310) 541-6900

4. El Pollo Inka

15400 Hawthorne Blvd
Lawndale, CA 90260
Phone number(310) 676-6665

5. Pollo A La Brasa

Harbor Gateway
16527 S Vermont Ave
Gardena, CA 90247
Phone number(310) 715-2494

6. El Pollo Inka

Hermosa Beach
1100 Pacific Coast Hwy
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254
Phone number(310) 372-1433

7. Kotosh

2408 Lomita Blvd
Lomita, CA 90717
Phone number(310) 257-1363

8. The Chicken Shack

Hermosa Beach
1030 Aviation Blvd
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254
Phone number(310) 372-1522

9. Pollo Inka Express

14146 Hawthorne Blvd
Hawthorne, CA 90250
Phone number(310) 978-8188

I have to say the lomo saltado wins here, fo’ sho.

10. El Pollo Inka Gardena

1425 W Artesia Blvd
Gardena, CA 90248
Phone number(310) 516-7378


11. Playa Blanca Peruvian Cuisine

El Segundo
413 Main St
El Segundo, CA 90245
Phone number(310) 615-0979

12. Peru Chix

1542 W Redondo Beach Blvd
Gardena, CA 90247
Phone number(310) 329-1340

13. Inca Gourmet Restaurant

15651 Hawthorne Blvd
Hawthorne, CA 90260
Phone number(310) 973-6476

14. El Virrey Restaurant

1353 W Rosecrans Ave
Gardena, CA 90247
Phone number(310) 327-1848

15. The Chicken Shack Rotisserie

Torrance
21712 Hawthorne Blvd
Torrance, CA 90503
Phone number

16. Juanita’s Peruvian Restaurant

11943 Inglewood Ave
Hawthorne, CA 90250
Phone number(310) 644-4668

17. The Chicken Shack

Hermosa Beach
1030 Aviation Blvd
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254
Phone number(310) 372-1522

18. The Chicken Shack

Torrance
3525 W Carson St
Torrance, CA 90503
Phone number(310) 370-3458

Peruvian Resturants - Santa Monica, Los Angeles, California

1. El Huarique

1301 Ocean Front Walk
Venice, CA 90291
Phone number(310) 452-1254

2. Paiche

13488 Maxella Ave
Marina Del Rey, CA 90292
Phone number(310) 893-6100

3. Qusqo Bistro and Gallery

West Los Angeles
11633 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90025
Phone number(310) 312-3800

Peruvian Restaurants - Long Beach, California

1. El Pollo Imperial

5991 Atlantic Ave
Long Beach, CA 90805
Phone number(562) 612-3315

2. Charo’s Peruvian Cuisine

7563 Carson St
Long Beach, CA 90808
Phone number(562) 627-0087

3. El Rocoto

11433 South St
Cerritos, CA 90703
Phone number(562) 924-1919

4. La Sonsonateca

5344 Long Beach Blvd
Long Beach, CA 90805
Phone number(562) 984-7071

5. Roe Restaurant & Fish Market

5374 E 2nd St
Long Beach, CA 90803
Phone number(562) 434-2763

6. The Factory Gastrobar

4020 Atlantic Ave
Long Beach, CA 90807
Phone number(562) 595-4020

7. The Sky Room

40 S Locust Ave
Long Beach, CA 90802
Phone number(562) 983-2703

8. Chiltepe

5631 Atlantic Ave
Long Beach, CA 90805
Phone number(562) 728-8713

the-inca-of-peru

History of the Incas – Peru

The Inca Empire was an empire centered in what is now Peru from 1400 to 1532 C.E. Over that period, the Inca used conquest and peaceful assimilation to incorporate in their empire a large portion of western South America, centered on the Andes mountain ranges. The Inca empire proved short-lived: by AD 1533, Atahualpa, the last Inca emperor, called a Sapa Inca, was killed on the orders of the conquistador Francisco Pizarro, marking the beginning of Spanish rule. He used the capture to gain gold as a ransom. Over four months, almost 8 tonnes of gold was collected. Pizarro was supposed to let the ruler of the Incas free once the ransom was paid, but instead had him strangled in public.

peruvian-incas

peruvian-incas

The Quechua name was Tawantin Suyu which can be translated The Four Regions or The Four United Regions. Before the Quechua spelling reform it was written in Spanish as Tahuantinsuyo. Tawantin is a group of four things (tawa “four” with the suffix -ntin which names a group); suyu means “region” or “province”.

The empire was divided into four suyus, whose corners met at the capital, Cusco (Qosqo), in modern-day Peru.

The official language of the empire was Quechua, although over seven hundred local languages were spoken. The Inca leadership encouraged the worship of their gods, the foremost of which was Inti, the sun god.

Origin stories

The Inca had four types of origin myths. In one, Tici Viracocha of Colina de las Ventanas in Pacaritambo sent forth his four sons and four daughters to establish a village. Along the way, Sinchi Roca was born to Manco and Ocllo, and Sinchi Roca is the person who finally led them to the valley of Cuzco where they founded their new village. There Manco became their leader and became known as Manco Cápac.

In another origin myth the sun god Inti ordered Manco Cápac and Mama Ocllo to emerge from the depths of Lake Titicaca and found the city of Cuzco. They traveled by means of underground caves until reaching Cuzco where they established Hurin Cuzco, or the first dynasty of the Kingdom of Cuzco.

In the third origin myth, an Inca sun god told his wife that he was lonely. She proposed that he create a civilization to worship him and keep him company. He saw this as a wise plan and carried it out. The Inca were born from Lake Cuzco and populated the Andes and worshiped their sun god.

In the last origin myth, Manco Cápac ,who was the son of the sun, and his sister Mama Occlo, the daughter of the moon, were sent by the sun to look for a place to build an empire. They were to tell when they were at the right place by carrying a special rod with them at all times. Wherever the rod sank into the ground, this was where they were to create a new city. The rod sank into the ground in Cuzco.

The knowledge of these myths is due to oral tradition, since the Incas did not have writing. Manco Cápac, who became the leader of his tribe, probably did exist, despite lack of solid evidence. The archeological evidence seems to indicate that the Inca were a relatively unimportant tribe until the time of Sinchi Roca, also called Cinchi Roca, who is the first figure in Inca mythology whose existence can be supported historically. The Incas were destroyed by the Spanish making it hard to find helpful clues about the Incas.

The Inca people began as a tribe in the Cuzco area around the 12th century AD. Under the leadership of Manco Cápac they formed the small city-state of Cuzco Quechua Qosqo), shown in red on the map.

In 1438 AD, under the command of Sapa Inca (paramount leader) Pachacuti, whose name literally meant “world-shaker”, they began a far-reaching expansion. The land Pachacuti conquered was about the size of the Thirteen Colonies of the United States in 1776, and consisted of nearly the entire Andes mountain range.

Pachacuti reorganized the kingdom of Cuzco into an empire, the Tahuantinsuyu, a federalist system which consisted of a central government with the Inca at its head and four provincial governments with strong leaders: Chinchasuyu (NW), Antisuyu (NE), Kuntisuyu (SW), and Qullasuyu (SE). Pachacuti is also thought to have built Machu Picchu, either as a family home or as a Camp David-like retreat[citation needed].

Pachacuti would send spies to regions he wanted in his empire who would report back on their political organization, military might and wealth. He would then send messages to the leaders of these lands extolling the benefits of joining his empire, offering them presents of luxury goods such as high quality textiles, and promising that they would be materially richer as subject rulers of the Inca. Most accepted the rule of the Inca as a fait accompli and acquiesced peacefully. The ruler’s children would then be brought to Cuzco to be taught about Inca administration systems, then return to rule their native lands. This allowed the Inca to indoctrinate the former ruler’s children into the Inca nobility, and, with luck, marry their daughters into families at various corners of the empire.

It was traditional for the Inca’s son to lead the army; Pachacuti’s son Túpac Inca began conquests to the north in 1463, and continued them as Inca after Pachucuti’s death in 1471. His most important conquest was the Kingdom of Chimor, the Inca’s only serious rival for the coast of Peru. Túpac Inca’s empire stretched north into modern day Ecuador and Colombia.

Túpac Inca’s son Huayna Cápac added significant territory to the south. At its height, Tahuantinsuyu included Peru and Bolivia, most of what is now Ecuador, a large portion of modern-day Chile, and extended into corners of Argentina and Colombia. Tahuantinsuyu was a patchwork of languages, cultures and peoples. The components of the empire were not all uniformly loyal, nor were the local cultures all fully integrated. The portions of the Chachapoya that had been conquered were almost openly hostile to the Inca, and the Inca nobles rejected an offer of refuge in their kingdom after their troubles with the Spanish.For instance, the Chimú used money in their commerce, while the Inca empire as a whole had an economy based on exchange and taxation of luxury goods and labour (it is said that Inca tax collectors would take the head lice of the lame and old as a symbolic tribute).

Economic productivity was based on collective labor which was organized in order to benefit the whole community. The ayni was used to help individual members of the community in need, such as a sick member of the community. The minka or team work represented community service and the mita was the tax paid to the Inca in the form of labor. The Inca did not use currency, economic exchanges were by reciprocity and took place in markets called catus.